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GOVT 6745 : Humanitarian Affects
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4176, ANTHR 7176, FGSS 4876, FGSS 6876, GOVT 4745, LGBT 4876 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Saida Hodzic
Liberal feminists and political theorists argue that sentiments such as compassion and empathy have the capacity to alert us to suffering, injustice, and oppression, and thus incite transformative political action. This interdisciplinary seminar explores the challenges to this theory by staging a conversation between postcolonial, feminist, and queer theories of affect, and anthropological critiques of humanitarian projects. Sentiments are mobilized to defend borders, wage wars, grant asylum to refugees, provide medical care and disaster relief, and inspire feminist activism. We will analyze how these gendered and racialized ethical projects and political regimes are co-constituted, and how they mediate access to resources and survival, as well as political agency, subjectivity, citizenship, and national belonging.
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GOVT 6433 : Quantitative Text Analysis
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Mona Krewel
This course is designed to provide doctoral students in political science with an introduction to advanced quantitative text analysis. Students will learn about all major types of content analyses, including manual, machine learning and automated content analysis techniques as well as methods for analyzing content analysis data. The class will demonstrate, how quantitative text analysis can be a useful tool in analyzing a variety of politically relevant texts (e.g. party manifestos, legislative outputs, social media). It will also provide an opportunity for doctoral candidates to present recent work based on text analysis techniques.
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GOVT 6353 : Field Seminar in Comparative Politics
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Kenneth Roberts
This course provides a graduate-level survey of the field of comparative politics, introducing students to classic works as well as recent contributions that build upon those works. Readings will draw from leading theoretical approaches-including structural, institutional, rational choice, and cultural perspectives-and cover a broad range of substantive topics, such as democratization, authoritarianism, states and civil society, political economy, and political participation and representation.
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GOVT 6122 : Foundations of the Social Sciences
Crosslisted as: ECON 6910, PHIL 6922 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Richard Bensel
Social science research almost always combines empirical observation (data), the construction of concepts (language), and the logical analysis of the relations between observations and concepts (statistics).  This course examines the relations between these three dimensions as the analyst moves from one to the other both as practice and in the crafting of a formal summary of findings and argument. We will be particularly interested in the foundational assumptions that underpin the connections between empirical reality, language, and statistical analysis. While these foundational assumptions are often taken for granted by social scientists, they vary dramatically between social science disciplines.  The implicit contradiction between that variance and their doxic acceptance within disciplines will be a primary focus of the course.
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GOVT 6109 : Field Methods
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Sabrina Karim
This graduate seminar introduces students to methods currently used by political scientists to develop and test for observable implications of theoretically-derived arguments using data collected away from their home institutions. Topics covered include the relationships between fieldwork and research design, case and site selection, ethnography and participant observation, interview methods, surveys and experiments in the context of field research, research ethics and human subjects, logistics of field research, grant-writing, safety protocols, and knowing when to come home. The course is designed primarily for students working on dissertation proposals or early stages of dissertation field research, but it may be helpful for students at other stages as well. A goal is to encourage students to specify a field research strategy that links testable hypotheses with methods of data gathering and analysis before commencing field work. Students, therefore, will develop their own research projects as the semester progresses, including writing actual grant proposals, IRB applications, and pre-analysis plans. 
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GOVT 6089 : Time Series Analysis
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Peter Enns
This course considers statistical techniques to analyze time series data. We will pay particular attention to common time series methods, assumptions, and examples from political and social science. The course will offer a general introduction to the topic and will cover more advanced topics, such as cointegration, error correction models, vector autoregression, fractional integration, and time-series cross-sectional analysis.
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GOVT 6075 : Field Seminar in Political Thought
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Jill Frank
The seminar will explore readings in the history of political thought from Homer to the Twenty-first century.
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GOVT 6067 : Field Seminar in International Relations
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Steven Ward
General survey of the literature and propositions of the international relations field. Criteria are developed for judging theoretical propositions and are applied to the major findings. Participants are expected to do extensive reading in the literature as well as research.
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GOVT 6022 : Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S.
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6022 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Jamila Michener
This course examines racial and ethnic politics in the United States, highlighting its fundamental and constitutive role in shaping American politics more broadly. We will explore the political origins of the American racial order and the ways it has both persisted and changed over time. Focusing on participation, representation and resistance, we will emphasize the political agency of racialized groups while recognizing the power of institutions and policies in shaping their trajectory. This course should provide students with the knowledge and analytical tools necessary to better understand and more effectively study the complexities of race that loom large in a post-Ferguson, post-Obama America.  
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GOVT 6019 : Introduction to Probability and Applied Statistics
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4019 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Bryce Corrigan
The goal of this course is to introduce probability and statistics as fundamental building blocks for quantitative political analysis, with regression modeling as a focal application. We will begin with a brief survey of probability theory, types of measurements, and descriptive statistics. The bulk of the course then addresses inferential statistics, covering in detail sampling, methods for estimating unknown quantities, and methods for evaluating competing hypotheses. We will see how to formally assess estimators, and some basic principles that help to ensure optimality. Along the way, we will introduce the use of regression models to specify social scientific hypotheses, and employ our expanding repertoire of statistical concepts to understand and interpret estimates based on our data. Weekly lab exercises require students to deploy the methods both 'by hand' so they can grasp the basic mathematics, and by computer to meet the conceptual demands of non-trivial examples and prepare for independent research. Some time will be spent reviewing algebra, calculus, and elementary logic, as well as introducing computer statistical packages.
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