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GOVT 1111 : Introduction to American Government and Politics
Crosslisted as: AMST 1115 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A policy-centered approach to the study of government in the American experience.  Considers the American Founding and how it influenced the structure of government;  how national institutions operate in shaping law and public policy; who has a voice in American politics and why some are more influential than others; and how existing public policies themselves influence social, economic, and political power.  Students will gain an introductory knowledge of the founding principles and structure of American government, political institutions, political processes, political behavior, and public policy.
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GOVT 1503 : Introduction to Africana Studies
Crosslisted as: AMST 1500, ASRC 1500 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the study of Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean and other diasporas.  This course will examine, through a range of disciplines, among them literature, history, politics, philosophy, the themes - including race/racism, the Middle Passage, sexuality, colonialism, and culture - that have dominated Africana Studies since its inception in the late-1960s. We will explore these issues in the attempt to understand how black lives have been shaped, in a historical sense; and, of course, the effects of these issues in the contemporary moment. This course seeks to introduce these themes, to investigate through one or more of the disciplines relevant to the question, and to provide a broad understanding of the themes so as to enable the kind of intellectual reflection critical to Africana Studies.
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GOVT 1817 : Making Sense of World Politics
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the basic concepts and practice of international politics with an emphasis on learning critical thinking.  The course is divided into two parts. In the first half, we will learn about different explanations.  In the second half, we will apply these explanations to a set of international events.  
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GOVT 1901 : Discussions of Justice
Crosslisted as: PHIL 1901, SOC 1900, PHIL 1901, SOC 1900, PHIL 1901, SOC 1900 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Weekly informal discussion of urgent public issues posed by a central theme, such as inequality, foreign policy and immigration, or challenges to liberty and democracy. Recent public lectures organized by Ethics and Public Life, brief initial presentations by Cornell researchers, or brief debates between participants are typical starting-points for conversations reflecting diverse perspectives.
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GOVT 2152 : (Im)migration and (Im)migrants: Then and Now
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
One in ten residents of the United States was born outside the country. These people include international students, temporary workers, refugees, asylees, permanent residents, naturalized U.S. citizens and undocumented migrants. The arrival of these newcomers affects the cultural, economic, political and social dynamics of the country. Since immigration shows no signs of slowing down—in the United States or in many other nations of the world—the causes, consequences and repercussions of immigration will be one of the most important topics of the 21- century. Therefore this class will examine the history and contemporary role of immigration in the U.S. political system. The class will focus on two aspects of immigration: First, a historical examination of immigration policy from the founding of the country all the way forward to the current debate over immigration reform. Second, we will evaluate and assess the political incorporation and political participation of immigrant groups in the U.S. and determine whether immigrants are being incorporated, and if not, why? We will reflect on many important questions including the costs and benefits of immigration, issues related to civil rights and civil liberties, and finally propose our own ideas and solutions to the current immigration reform debate.
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GOVT 2225 : Controversies About Inequality
Crosslisted as: AMST 2225, DSOC 2220, ILROB 2220, PAM 2220, PHIL 1950, SOC 2220 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In recent years, poverty and inequality have become increasingly common topics of public debate, as academics, journalists, and politicians attempt to come to terms with growing income inequality, with the increasing visibility of inter-country differences in wealth and income, and with the persistence of racial, ethnic, and gender stratification. This course introduces students to ongoing social scientific debates about the sources and consequences of inequality, as well as the types of public policy that might appropriately be pursued to reduce (or increase) inequality. These topics will be addressed in related units, some of which include guest lectures by faculty from other universities (funded by the Center for the Study of Inequality). Each unit culminates with a highly spirited class discussion and debate.
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GOVT 2264 : Contemporary Civil Wars
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course explores the causes and consequences of modern day civil wars.  The first part of the course looks at individual, group, and state level factors that might cause civil wars to break out.  The second part of the course looks at the dynamics of civil wars including intensity and types of violence.  The third part assesses the consequences of civil war and the last part assesses how civil wars end. 
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GOVT 2432 : Moral Dilemmas in the Law
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2430 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The course concerns the principles and philosophical arguments underlying conflicts and moral dilemmas of central and ongoing concern to society as they arise within legal contexts. We consider questions such as what justifies using state power to punish people for wrongdoing, what kinds of conduct are rightly criminalized, what justifies the Supreme Court's power to strike down Congressional legislation, what justifies the right to private property and its boundaries, what is the right to privacy and why it is important, what are human rights, and what is the morality and law of war. Throughout we will be reading legal cases and philosophical commentaries that engage with the deep issues that the cases pose.
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GOVT 2553 : Inside Europe
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will cover current events in Europe as they unfold during the semester. Faculty from across the university how have some expertise on European issues will be invited to deepen students' understanding of elections, European Union actions and debates, refugee issues, security issues, and other relevant political and social events occurring in Europe. The course will respond  flexibly to unforeseen events, teach students to become intelligent consumer of high quality news sources on Europe, and expose students to different points of view on these issues.
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GOVT 2747 : History of the Modern Middle East
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2674, HIST 2674, NES 2674 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines major trends in the evolution of the Middle East in the modern era. Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries and ending with the  "Arab Spring," we will consider Middle East history with an emphasis on five themes: imperialism, nationalism, modernization, Islam, and revolution.  Readings will be supplemented with translated primary sources, which will form the backbone of class discussions.
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GOVT 2817 : America Confronts the World
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Donald Trump and Barak Obama give us two visions of America and of the world: xenophobic nationalism and pragmatic cosmopolitanism.  America and the world are thus constituted by great diversity. The first half of the course seeks to understand that diversity in American politics and foreign policy viewed through the prisms of region, ideology, region, race, class and religion. The second half inquires into the U.S. and American engagement of different world regions and civilizations: Europe, Russia, North America, Latin America, China, Japan, India and the Middle East. U.S. hard power and American soft power find expression in far-reaching processes of American-infused globalization and U.S.-centered anti-Americanism reverberating around the world. Advocates of one-size-fits-all solutions to America's and the world's variegated politics are in for great disappointments.
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GOVT 3082 : American Political Campaigns
Crosslisted as: AMST 3082 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course focuses on political campaigns, a central feature of American democracy. We will examine how they work and the conditions under which they affect citizens' decisions. The course looks at campaign strategies and attributes of candidates, as well as how and whether they affect key outcomes such as the decision to turn out, who to vote for, and whether to spend money and volunteer time helping favored candidates win.
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GOVT 3141 : Prisons
Crosslisted as: AMST 3141 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The United States stands alone among Western, industrialized countries with its persistent, high rates of incarceration, long sentences, and continued use of the death penalty. This "American exceptionalism" -- the turn to mass incarceration -- has been fostered by the use of sharply-delineated categories that define vast numbers of people as outlaws and others as law-abiding. These categories that are based on ideas of personal responsibility and assumptions about race are modified somewhat by a liberal commitment to human rights.   Our purpose in this course is to understand how such ideas have taken root and to locate the consequences of these ideas for policy and practice. 
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GOVT 3142 : Incarceration, Policy Response, and Self-Reflection
Crosslisted as: AMST 3142 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This class is intended to provoke some hard thinking about the relationship of committed "outsiders" and advocates of change to the experience of crime, punishment, and incarceration and to the men we meet at Auburn/Cayuga who have been in most instances long-confined to prison. We will read, think, talk and write about the incarceration experience and about policies that shape this experience. We will also think self-reflexively about the character of the 'outsider's' educational, political, and personal engagement.   What are the motivations and what are the goals of such engagement? What are the anticipated outcomes - personal, social, educational, political, and/or moral and perhaps spiritual? In an effort to delve deeply into these questions, we will read a broad selection of work on incarceration, itself, as well as on the experience of what has come to be termed service learning or civic engagement.
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GOVT 3168 : The Road to the White House, 2016
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The United States is currently in the middle of a heated Presidential election.  This course will follow this election through its final months, looking at the candidates, the debates, the House and Senate races, the voters, and all the vast paraphernalia of a modern political campaign.  Students will investigate the election from a wide range of perspectives - political, economic, business, and historical – in order to understand not only the election, but its context. The role of the media - both traditional and social – will be analyzed. After election night, course will evaluate the outcome to understand what may happen to America going forward.
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GOVT 3274 : Game Theory and Politics
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Game theory is the (mathematical) study of strategic actors trying to get what they want. Political Science is the study of who gets what, when, and how. So, it should come as no surprise that game theory has provided insight into many of the fundamental questions in Political Science. In this class we will study some of the most influential and controversial of these applications, including to the following questions. How is it possible to get individuals, political parties, and countries to cooperate?  Why are some dictatorships overthrown, while others last for generations? Why do people vote, and how to parties compete for their votes? Why do politicians comply with democratic rules in the first place?  
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GOVT 3284 : Populism, Democracy & Authoritarianism
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Populist leaders, movements, and parties who claim to represent "the people" (however defined) and challenge political establishments have shaken up the traditional political order in many countries around the world in recent times.  The populist label is loosely applied to a wide range of political phenomena, however, on both the left- and right-wings of the political establishment, including such iconic figures as Juan Perón and Hugo Chávez in Latin America, Marine Le Pen, Viktor Orban, and the Podemos movement in contemporary Europe, and Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines—not to mention Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders in the United States.  Many followers of such leaders see populism as providing a corrective to flawed or failed representative institutions under democracy; critics of populism, on the other hand, believe it has intrinsic authoritarian tendencies, and thus see populism as a serious threat to democratic rule.
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GOVT 3303 : Politics of the Global North
Crosslisted as: ILRIC 4330 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
From a perspective based on comparative political economy, this course examines pressing contemporary issues such as the politics of growing inequality.  We consider conflicts around markets, democracy, economic and social justice, including the efforts of actors such as governments nd labor unions aimed at economic recovery, reducing inequality, and the reform of national and global economic policy and institutions.  We also look at distinctive types of political and economic organization, especially in Europe and the United States, and the capacities of these societies to meet current economic, political, and social challenges, both domestic and internationl.
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GOVT 3364 : Europe in Times of Crisis
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This class is designed as a comparative introduction to the governmental systems in Europe, with a concentration on Western European states. Students will gain an introductory knowledge on a selection of European Union (EU) member states as well as become familiar with the history, actors, institutions and outcomes of the European Union. Having gained some basic knowledge on Europe, we will then move on to address some current political issues in Europe including the European debt crisis, the British EU Referendum and the refugee crisis. Can the European project still be saved? Please note, that the course will also respond flexibly to unforeseen events in Europe.
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GOVT 3494 : Special Topics in Regional Development and Globalization
Crosslisted as: AMST 3854, CRP 3854 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course addresses pertinent issues relative to the subject of regional development and globalization. Topics vary each semester.
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GOVT 3503 : Becoming a China Hand
Crosslisted as: CAPS 3502 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines the various issues that surround being a specialist of one of the world's most complex and exciting places. The course will first look at the various groups of people that have been China Hands, including missionaries, academics, businesspeople, journalists, and government officials. One central theme is the continual conflict between being a country specialist and gaining an understanding of the broader world. The second part of the class considers the strategies for going into the field and doing research on China, including finding a host and making connections, using written sources (electronic and printed), conducting interviews, and implementing formal surveys. The last segment of the class considers the charge that China Hands are prone to self-censorship because of ideological affinity.
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GOVT 3547 : America, Business & International Political Economy
Crosslisted as: AEM 3547, DSOC 3547, ILRIC 3547, NBA 5050 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Do you want to learn the discussion-based case method as taught at the Harvard Business School? Do you want to learn how to write a long research paper? Do you not want to take a final examination? If you answer these questions affirmatively, this course may be for you. We are told often that American primacy is in decline and that other powers are rising. What does this mean when we examine the experience of Government and Business in different countries around the world?  Is the international political economy a hydraulic system in which some units rise and others fall? Are the dynamics of the international political economy all pointing in one direction? Or are they marked by cross-currents?  This course seeks answers to these questions by teaching the basics of macro-economics, examining a range of powerful states (among others China, India, Russia and Japan) and persisting issues (financial globalization and foreign investment; oil and OPEC; trade and aid) as they play themselves out in different countries (such as Malaysia, Korea; Saudi Arabia, Nigeria; Mexico, Brazil, Uganda, Indonesia).
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GOVT 3605 : Ideology
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will focus on critical approaches to the study of ideology in order to understand the role of ideology in political subject formation. After an initial presentation of the classical Marxist texts on ideology, we will examine twentieth century reworkings of hegemony theorist Antonio Gramsci and the critical structuralist approaches of Roland Barthes, Jean Baudrillard and Dick Hebdige. We will concentrate on the "lived relation" to ruling ideas in the form of ideologies of everyday life. The second part of the course will be devoted to psychoanalytically oriented theories (Freud, Lacan) which address the internalization of belief, both in relation to the intrapsychic and in the interaction between psychic and state apparatuses. We conclude with Louis Althusser's notion of interpellation, which resumes the Marxist, structuralist and psychoanalytic objectives of the course material. The theorists in the second part of the course will be contextualized within the experience of the historical traumas of fascism and French decolonization. Throughout the semester, we will be reflecting on the continued relevance of historic ideologies, centered around notions of class interest, to late twentieth century ideologies' attachments to national, religious, gendered, ethnic, technological identity.
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GOVT 3785 : Civil Disobedience
Crosslisted as: AMST 3785 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will expose students to the theory and practice of civil disobedience in historical and contemporary perspectives. Do citizens have obligations to obey unjust laws? What makes disobedience civil rather than criminal? How do people take power into their own hands without recourse to violence? How has political dissent transformed in a digital era? And how do acts of protest influence public opinion and policy? We will pursue answers to these questions and others through studying both classic theorists of civil disobedience and contemporary debates about whistleblowing, direct action, nonviolence, and hacktivism.
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GOVT 3786 : What is a People? The Social Contract and its Discontents
Crosslisted as: COML 3780, FREN 3780 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
When Jean-Jacques Rousseau introduced the concept of the "general will" in his classic text The Social Contract, he made what was then an unprecedented and scandalous claim: that the people as a whole, and not an individual agent, could be the subject of political will and self-determination.  This claim was all the more revolutionary in that historically "the people" [ie peuple] named those poor masses who had no political representation, and who were subjects of the state only to the extent that they were subject to the will of a sovereign monarch.  What then is "the people," and how is it constituted as a collective subject?  How does a people speak, or make its will known?  Can that will be represented or institutionalized?  Do all people belong to the people?  How inclusive is the social contract?  This course will examine crucial moments in the constitution of the people from the French Revolution to the present day, considering the crisis of political representation they have alternately exposed or engendered and the forms of the social contract to which they have given rise.  Our discussions will range from major political events (the French and Haitian Revolutions, the Paris Commune, colonialism and decolonization, May '68) to contemporary debates around universalism, secularism, immigration, and "marriage for all."  Readings by Rousseau, Robespierre, L'Ouverture, Michelet, Marx, Freud, Arendt, Balibar, and Rancière.
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GOVT 3827 : China and the World
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3327, CAPS 3827 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Study of the dramatic rise of China through reviewing major developments in contemporary Chinese foreign policy since the establishment of the People's Republic of China (PRC), and concentrating more specifically on major developments in Chinese foreign policy during the 1980s and 1990s. Such a wide-ranging survey of Chinese foreign policy involves not only a consideration of the evolution of China's relations with its major bilateral partners but also an investigation of how China has defined its broader relationship with the international system. In addition, students are asked to consider which causal factors have been of primary importance in motivating Chinese behavior.
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GOVT 3999 : How Do You Know That?
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Does allowing citizens to carry concealed weapons reduce violent crime? Do affirmative action policies at law schools cause black students to fail the bar? Do micro-finance policies make the poor better off? Do the militaries of democracies fight better in the field than those of non-democracies? Does the death penalty save lives by deterring murders? Answering questions like these about the effects of public policy implies cause and effect knowledge: if we implement policy X, we will get effect Y. But on what evidence should answers to questions like these rest? How do you know the answer, and under what conditions can you? Providing robust answers to cause-and-effect questions in a (mostly) non-experimental field like political science is devilishly difficult. In this course, we will learn some of the pitfalls that make it so hard to evaluate evidence in the public policy realm, how to judge the quality of evidence cited in the media, and how to ask the right questions to get the best possible evidence. We'll do so by working through the evidence supporting "yes" or "no" answers to the questions listed above.
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GOVT 4000 : Major Seminar
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Major seminars in the Government department are small, advanced courses that cover an important theme or topic in contemporary politics in depth. Courses place particular emphasis on careful reading and classroom discussion, and students can expect to write a significant research paper. The enrollment limit is 15 students. These courses are open to all Cornell students, but preference in admissions is given to seniors over juniors, and to Government majors over other students.  Topics vary by semester and section.
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GOVT 4015 : Existentialism or Marxism
Crosslisted as: GERST 4210, ROMS 4210 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The most intense public encounter between Existentialism and Marxism occurred in immediate post-WWII Europe, its structure remaining alive internationally. Existentialist questions have been traced from pre-Socratic thinkers through Dante, Shakespeare, and Cervantes onward; just as roots of modern materialism extend to Epicurus and Lucretius, or Leopardi. This course will focus on differing theories and concomitant practices concerned with "alienation," "anxiety," "crisis," "death of God," "nihilism," "rebellion or revolution." Crucial are possible relations between fiction and non-fiction; also among philosophy, theology, psychoanalysis, and political theory. Other authors may include: Althusser, de Beauvoir, Beckett, Büchner, Camus, Che, Dostoevsky, Fanon, Genet, Gide, Gramsci, O. Gross, Hamsun, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, C.L.R. James, Kafka, Kierkegaard, Lagerkvist, Lacan, Lenin, Marx, Merleau-Ponty, Mishima, G. Novack, Nietzsche, Ortega, Pirandello, W. Reich, Sartre, Shestov, Tillich, Unamuno. There is also cinema.
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GOVT 4019 : Introductory Probability and Applied Statistics
Crosslisted as: GOVT 6019 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The goal of this course is to introduce probability and statistics as fundamental building blocks for quantitative political analysis, with regression modeling as a focal application. We will begin with a brief survey of probability theory, types of measurements, and descriptive statistics. The bulk of the course then addresses inferential statistics, covering in detail sampling, methods for estimating unknown quantities, and methods for evaluating competing hypotheses. We will see how to formally assess estimators, and some basic principles that help to ensure optimality. Along the way, we will introduce the use of regression models to specify social scientific hypotheses, and employ our expanding repertoire of statistical concepts to understand and interpret estimates based on our data. Weekly lab exercises require students to deploy the methods both 'by hand' so they can grasp the basic mathematics, and by computer to meet the conceptual demands of non-trivial examples and prepare for independent research. Some time will be spent reviewing algebra, calculus, and elementary logic, as well as introducing computer statistical packages.
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GOVT 4021 : American Conservative Thought
Crosslisted as: AMST 4021 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
American conservative thought rests on assumptions that are strikingly different from those made by mainstream American liberals.  However, conservative thinkers are themselves committed to principles that are both quite varied and sometimes contradictory.  This course examines the assumptions upon which rest the libertarian, market/economic, and cultural/traditional strains of American conservatism and asks whether the tensions between them weaken or strengthen conservative thought as an alternative to mainstream liberalism.
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GOVT 4102 : Governing Green Cities
Crosslisted as: AMST 4102, AMST 6104, GOVT 6102 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the importance of government and political processes for improving urban environments, human health, and resilience in the face of climate change.
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GOVT 4194 : Asian Political Economy
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4498 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar is an advanced introduction to political economy in contemporary South, Southeast, and East Asia. Our central task is to uncover the political underpinnings of economic performance across countries and over time. Along the way, we will address issues such as corruption and rent-seeking, the developmental state, class conflict, ethnic politics, reform and stagnation, and democracy.
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GOVT 4283 : Latino Politics as Racial Politics
Crosslisted as: LSP 4283 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This class will examine the history and contemporary role of Latinos as a minority group in the U.S. political system. This course is intended as an overview of the political position of Latinos y Latinas in the United States. We place special emphasis on how Latinos became racial group which allows us to focus on political relationships between Latinos and non-Latinos as they relate to political institutions, political parties, voting coalitions, representation and public policy.
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GOVT 4877 : China and Asian Security
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4475, CAPS 4870, GOVT 6877 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course focuses primarily on China's evolving role in both Asia and world politics. While China may not necessarily be the sole determinant of the type of security order that will prevail in Asia, it has a profound influence on the region and potentially on the global order as well. To gain an understanding of security issues in Asia today, the seminar attempts to come to terms with the evolving nature of China's foreign policy and national security strategies. The course then concentrates on the most influential academic work on China's foreign relations and national security policies that has been published since the end of the Cold War.  
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GOVT 4949 : Honors Seminar: Thesis Clarification and Research
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar creates a structured environment in which honors students will examine different  research approaches and methods and construct a research design for their own theses—a thesis proposal that probes a new or inadequately researched question of importance to the discipline of political science or political theory. Apart from being a thesis writing workshop, the honors research class serves as a capstone course giving an overview of the different topics and methods addressed by students of politics. Members of the class will do extensive reading in published work relevant to their topics, and write a critical summary of that literature. Each member of the class will present their research design and central question(s) to the class for constructive criticism. By the end of the class, each honors student will have written the first chapter of the thesis, including the statement of the question, literature review, key definitions, methodology, and identification of data source(s). They will be working closely with an individual faculty adviser, as well as interacting with the research class. Students are strongly encouraged to examine some past honors theses on reserve at Kroch library in order to get an idea of the standards a government thesis must meet
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GOVT 4987 : Domestic Politics and International Relations
Crosslisted as: GOVT 6987 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This is a seminar investigating how domestic politics - elections, public opinion, elite politics in authoritarian regimes, etc - affect states' foreign policy decisions. The course will involve a survey of the extensive scholarly literature on the subject, focusing primarily on security politics but also with applications to topics in IPE.
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GOVT 4999 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
One-on-one tutorial arranged by the student with a faculty member of his or her choosing. Open to government majors doing superior work, and it is the responsibility of the student to establish the research proposal and to find a faculty sponsor. Applicants for independent study must present a well-defined program of study that cannot be satisfied by pursuing courses in the regularly scheduled curriculum. No more than 4 credits of independent study may count toward fulfillment of the major. Students who elect to continue taking this course for more than one semester must select a new theme or subject each semester. Credit can be given only for work that results in a satisfactory amount of writing. Emphasis is on the capacity to subject a body of related readings to analysis and criticism. Keep in mind that independent study cannot be used to fulfill the seminar requirement. The application form for independent study is available in 210 White Hall and must be completed at the beginning of the semester in which the course is being taken.
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GOVT 6019 : Introduction to Probability and Applied Statistics
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4019 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The goal of this course is to introduce probability and statistics as fundamental building blocks for quantitative political analysis, with regression modeling as a focal application. We will begin with a brief survey of probability theory, types of measurements, and descriptive statistics. The bulk of the course then addresses inferential statistics, covering in detail sampling, methods for estimating unknown quantities, and methods for evaluating competing hypotheses. We will see how to formally assess estimators, and some basic principles that help to ensure optimality. Along the way, we will introduce the use of regression models to specify social scientific hypotheses, and employ our expanding repertoire of statistical concepts to understand and interpret estimates based on our data. Weekly lab exercises require students to deploy the methods both 'by hand' so they can grasp the basic mathematics, and by computer to meet the conceptual demands of non-trivial examples and prepare for independent research. Some time will be spent reviewing algebra, calculus, and elementary logic, as well as introducing computer statistical packages.
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GOVT 6049 : Categorical and Count Data
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course continues the path of 6019 and 6029 in offering a hybrid of applied social statistics and econometric modeling for graduate students, with a focus on the analysis of categorical and count data as dependent variables. These forms of data are now extremely common in the social sciences. In the first three weeks we attain mastery of some of the more intricate Stata and R post-estimation procedures. These are essential for interpreting typical models of categories and counts, since in the typical application, effects on the mean of the dependent variable are not constant but vary with settings of the explanatory variables. We then proceed to the key application, the analysis of non-continuous dependent variables. Each student will be required to actively participate in a group presentation of the nuts and bolts of a data analysis using this kind of data, either assigned by the instructor or based off peer research. Students with active quantitative research projects are encouraged to join the course for an opportunity to hone the analysis, and to receive feedback from peers and the instructor.
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GOVT 6059 : Panel and Multilevel Data
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course continues the path of 6019 and 6029 in offering a hybrid of applied social statistics and econometric modeling for graduate students, with a focus on panel, time-series cross-section, and multilevel data. Such data are now commonplace, presenting additional complications but also offering statistical and quasi-experimental leverage via repeated measurements and change-points. The main topics will be the use and choice among robust standard errors and fixed and random effects estimators, a variety of multi-level specifications and their estimation and interpretation, and a key application called multi-level regression and post-stratification (MRP). At the end of the course, we will examine dynamic models, focusing on their assumptions, interpretation, and related pitfalls. Each student will be required to actively participate in a group presentation of the nuts and bolts of a data analysis using this kind of data, either assigned by the instructor or based off peer research. Students with active quantitative research projects are encouraged to join the course for an opportunity to hone the analysis, and to receive feedback from peers and the instructor.
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GOVT 6067 : Field Seminar in International Relations
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
General survey of the literature and propositions of the international relations field. Criteria are developed for judging theoretical propositions and are applied to the major findings. Participants are expected to do extensive reading in the literature as well as research.
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GOVT 6102 : Governing Green Cities
Crosslisted as: AMST 4102, AMST 6104, GOVT 4102 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the importance of government and political processes for improving urban environments, human health, and resilience in the face of climate change.
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GOVT 6294 : Parties, Populism and Movements
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Political parties, populism, and social movements are all forms of political representation, but typically they are studied in isolation from one another.  This research seminar will explore the interrelationships between them—namely, how populism and social movements tend to emerge where partisan representation is weak or ineffectual, and how populism and social movements can break down or reconfigure party systems.  Readings will include classic theoretical and empirical analyses of parties, populism, and movements, as well as recent works that explore the intersections among them. Students will help lead seminar discussions and write a research paper in one of the three areas of interest.
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GOVT 6353 : Field Seminar in Comparative Politics
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course provides a graduate-level survey of the field of comparative politics, introducing students to classic works as well as recent contributions that build upon those works. Readings will draw from leading theoretical approaches-including structural, institutional, rational choice, and cultural perspectives-and cover a broad range of substantive topics, such as democratization, authoritarianism, states and civil society, political economy, and political participation and representation.
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GOVT 6433 : Quantitative Text Analysis
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is designed to provide doctoral students in political science with an introduction to advanced quantitative text analysis. Students will learn about all major types of content analyses, including manual, machine learning and automated content analysis techniques as well as methods for analyzing content analysis data. The class will demonstrate, how quantitative text analysis can be a useful tool in analyzing a variety of politically relevant texts (e.g. party manifestos, legislative outputs, social media). It will also provide an opportunity for doctoral candidates to present recent work based on text analysis techniques.
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GOVT 6461 : Public Opinion
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course provides an introduction to the public opinion literature. Special attention will be paid to the determinants of political attitudes and their role in the larger political system.
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GOVT 6596 : Theories of Non/Violence
Crosslisted as: AMST 6596 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will examine the theory and practice of nonviolence from the perspective of its key theorists, practitioners, and critics. Questions we will consider include: Why nonviolence? How should we understand the transformative power of nonviolence? What is the relationship between nonviolence and the body; nonviolence and religion; nonviolence and the state? Are there tensions or trade-offs between the idea of nonviolence as a moral/religious stance and the idea of nonviolence as a strategy of power? What are the limits of nonviolence? We will study key works by theorists of nonviolence including Garrison, Tolstoy, Gandhi, King as well as writing on violence and nonviolence in political theory (eg. Nietzsche, Fanon, Arendt, Benjamin, Foucault, Derrida, Butler, etc.).
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GOVT 6676 : Critical Continental Thought
Crosslisted as: FREN 6676 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This semester we will focus upon the right to life, techniques of life management and the disposition of (one's own) death. The co-imbrication of the politico-theological with the death penalty, the way society classifies and treats its dead, its « living dead » or excluded members (« the public enemy »), and the political economy of death will figure among questions and philosophical concepts to be addressed in the seminar. We will concentrate on three authors-Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault and Jean Baudrillard-and their three principal texts (respectively)- The Seminar on the Death Penalty, volume one; Punitive Society (1972-3 Course at the Collège de France), and Symbolic Exchange and Death. The work of other twentieth century French thinkers on temporality and the economy of death such as Bataille and Blanchot will supplement our critical engagement with these thinkers. At the same time, we will attend to the tension within these texts within a larger context of recent developments in public law and other purported associated rights and philosophemes (the rights of/to literature; free speech and tolerance.)
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GOVT 6785 : Persecution and the Art of Writing
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6780, COML 6661, GERST 6780, JWST 6780 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Our title is derived from the political philosopher Leo Strauss, who provides our initial analytic, methodological, and theoretical model. But we extend it beyond Straussian ideological positions and we include Art unrestricted to Written philosophy and literature, as in painting, music, cinema, and Reason of State. Persecution (via censorship or heterodoxy) is understood as being both externally imposed and internalized. "The double rhetoric" or "esotericism," and hence "writing between the lines," has a millennial history dating back to archaic times in probably all known cultures. We focus on more recent manifestations across disciplines, periods, and places. Examples include Gramsci (Prison Notebooks), Hegel (as read by Left-Hegelians and by Marx), and Lessing (on the Free Masons), but also Nietzsche, Heidegger, Freud, Wittgenstein, and their legacies.
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GOVT 6877 : China and Asian Security
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4475, CAPS 4870, GOVT 4877 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course focuses primarily on China's evolving role in both Asia and world politics. It does so based on the premise that what China does in Asia may not necessarily be the sole determinant of the type of security order that will prevail there, but, that it does have a profound influence on the region (and, potentially, on the global order as well). In other words, in order to gain an understanding of the state of security issues in Asia today the seminar attempts to come to terms with the evolving nature of China's foreign policy and national security strategies. The course then concentrates on the most influential academic work on China's foreign relations and national security policies that has been published since the end of the Cold War.  
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GOVT 6969 : Research, Writing & Teaching in the Profession
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines political science as a discipline and profession, reviews teaching strategies and philosophy, and examines and motivates the conceptualization and development of original research.  Upon successful completion, students should understand what it is to be a political scientist, and the ethical duties and norms governing their professional role; they will know how to develop course syllabi, assess student learning, conduct original research, write conference and funding proposals; and they will be prepared to seek work in their chosen profession.
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GOVT 6987 : Domestic Politics and International Relations
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4987 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This is a seminar investigating how domestic politics - elections, public opinion, elite politics in authoritarian regimes, etc - affect states' foreign policy decisions. The course will involve a survey of the extensive scholarly literature on the subject, focusing primarily on security politics but also with applications to topics in IPE.
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GOVT 7073 : Game Theory 1
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This is the first in a two course sequence that introduces graduate students in political science to game theory, a tool for studying strategic interaction that is now used throughout the discipline. In the first course, students will learn the basics concepts of game theory and how to solve most of types of games used in applied political science work. The course requires only high-school level mathematics, and no prior training in game theory or formal methods.
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GOVT 7274 : Civil War
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course provides a survey of classic and contemporary work on civil war by political scientists.  It begins by exploring the conceptualization of civil wars, including an assessment of how social scientists study civil war.  It then dives into the literature on the causes, dynamics of, and consequences of civil war.  The last part of the class looks at conflict management and investigates how civil wars end. 
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GOVT 7937 : Proseminar in Peace Studies
Crosslisted as: STS 7937 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course provides an overview of the interdisciplinary field of Peace and Conflict Studies for graduate students.   The core of the course is a series of weekly lectures with Cornell and visiting speakers, supplemented by additional meetings with the visitors. 
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GOVT 7999 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Individualized readings and research for graduate students. Topics, readings, and writing requirements are designed through consultation between the student and the instructor. Graduate students in government who are looking to use this as an option to fulfill their course requirements should check with their chairs to be certain that the program of study is acceptable for this purpose. Applications must be completed and signed by the instructor and by the chairs of their special committees. They are available from, and must be returned to, the graduate assistant in 212 White Hall.
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