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GOVT 1101 : FWS: Power and Politics
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This First-Year Writing Seminar is devoted to the study of political power and the interaction of citizens and governments and provides the opportunity to write extensively about these issues. Topics vary by semester.
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GOVT 1313 : Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to comparative politics—the study of the political institutions, identities, and organized interests in countries around the world. Emphasis is on how to make meaningful comparisons between systems in different countries. Towards that goal, we will be looking at a dozen countries with different histories, political systems, and from various regions around the world.  We will also use a comparative framework to use our knowledge of these (and other) countries to examine questions about democracies and democratization, electoral systems and political parties, authoritarian regimes, political mobilization and change, economic development and globalization, nationalism and identity politics, among other topics.  The meta theme of this course is the comparative method as a unique way of leveraging our understanding about social and political phenomena.
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GOVT 1615 : Introduction to Modern Political Theory
Crosslisted as: PHIL 1920 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course offers a survey of modern political theory in the West.  We will examine some of the persistent dilemmas of political modernity and the attempts of several canonical political theorists to respond to them: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche.  In each case, we will attend to the particular crises these theorists addressed in their work—such as the European wars of religion, the English Civil War, colonialism, the French Revolution, and industrial capitalism—as well as the broader philosophical and political issues they continue to pose to us now.  Our approach will be both historical and conceptual, in other words, with the hopes of providing students with a nuanced but clear understanding of political theory as a distinctive form of political inquiry.
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GOVT 1901 : Discussions of Justice
Crosslisted as: PHIL 1901, SOC 1900, PHIL 1901, SOC 1900, PHIL 1901, SOC 1900 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Weekly informal discussion of urgent public issues posed by a central theme, such as inequality, foreign policy and immigration, or challenges to liberty and democracy. Recent public lectures organized by Ethics and Public Life, brief initial presentations by Cornell researchers, or brief debates between participants are typical starting-points for conversations reflecting diverse perspectives.
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GOVT 2604 : Obama and the Meaning of Race
Crosslisted as: AMST 2504, ASRC 2504, SOC 2520 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The election of Barack Obama to the presidency has raised new questions in the American debate on race, politics, and social science. Has America entered a post-racial society in which racism and inequality are things of the past? Or does Obama's post-Black, race-neutral approach to governing signal the end of Black politics, race-based activism and prescriptive policy? In this course, students will use the Obama presidency to think, talk, and write about how race works in America. We'll examine the symbolism of Obama's personal narrative and biracialism to analyze his race-neutral campaigns and governing within the context of history, politics, and policies. We'll look at the public image of Michelle Obama, especially how she is gendered as Black radical and fashionista.
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GOVT 2673 : The History and Politics of Modern Egypt
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2670, HIST 2672, NES 2670 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This lecture class will explore the socio-cultural history of modern Egypt from the late 18th century to the 21st century "Arab Spring." We will explore Egyptian history under the Ottomans and the Mamluks, the unsuccessful French attempts to colonize Egypt, and the successful British occupation of the country. We will then examine the development of Egyptian nationalism from the end of the 19th century through Nasser's pan-Arabism to the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. We will accomplish this with the aid of a variety of texts and media, including novels and films.
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GOVT 3002 : Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
Crosslisted as: AMST 3002 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course presents an overview of the law regarding civil rights and civil liberties. But the law is only part of our focus. Rights do not spring into existence simply because a judge pounded a gavel or a president signed a bill. The rights and liberties we take for granted have been the subject of violent and bitter contests that go to the very meaning of national identity. To study the law of civil rights and civil liberties in this country is to study not just a collection of cases and statutes, but a history of endless struggle and eternally unfulfilled promise about what it means to be an American. Like GOVT 3001, this class places the development of civil rights and civil liberties in historic, political, and economic context.
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GOVT 3041 : Win, Lose or Cheat?
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In the U.S. Presidential election of 2000, a Supreme Court ruling ultimately cleared the way for Florida's Secretary of State to certify electors pledged to the Republican party. Yet thousands of mis-marked butterfly ballots alone imply that a plurality of Florida's population did not prefer Bush. In this class we ask, what is a 'fair' electoral system in terms of representing the preferences of the public? In what ways can actual vote tallies and election outcomes deviate as measurements of these preferences? To address the latter question, we consider the emerging social science of election forensics and its application to recent disputed elections in Russia, Iran, Mexico, and Turkey, among other high-profile cases.
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GOVT 3091 : Science in the American Polity, 1960 to Now
Crosslisted as: AMST 3911, STS 3911 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course reviews the changing political relations between science, technology, and the state in America from 1960 to the present. It focuses on policy choices involving science and technology in different institutional settings, such as Congress, the court system, and regulatory agencies. The tension between the concepts of science as an autonomous republic and as just another interest group is a central theme.
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GOVT 3112 : Congress and the Legislative Process
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The course will be a lecture course on Congress, introducing them to the political science literature on the topic and the major research questions and approaches. We will examine the development of the institution, including formal theories for congressional organization as well as historically and politically oriented accounts of rule changes, committee power, and party influence. We will also look at the determinants of legislative productivity and gridlock, approaches to measuring and analyzing congressional behavior, the changing role of the electoral connection, and the causes and consequences of polarization.
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GOVT 3131 : The Nature, Functions, and Limits of Law
Crosslisted as: AMST 3131, LAW 4131 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
A general-education course to acquaint students with how our legal system pursues the goals of society. The course introduces students to various perspectives on the nature of law, what functions it ought to serve in society, and what it can and cannot accomplish. The course proceeds in the belief that such matters constitute a valuable and necessary part of a general education, not only for pre-law students but especially for students in other fields. Assigned readings comprise legal materials and also secondary sources on the legal process and the role of law in society. The classes include discussion and debate about current legal and social issues, including equality, safety, the environment, punishment, and autonomy.
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GOVT 3152 : Prisons, Politics & Policy
Crosslisted as: AMST 3155 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Prisons are social and political institutions governed by local, state and national policies. They have a profound influence on American society, especially on our political community.  They amplify inequality and disadvantage. The massive number of people imprisoned in the United States speaks volumes about our policy priorities and about our democracy. How did things get this way? How did we end up being the nation that incarcerates more of its population than virtually any other? What policy processes directly and indirectly account for this? What explains the change that we now appear to be experiencing? What is the future of the U.S. prison system? What is the future of our democracy? This course will tackle these and other pressing questions. Students will gain an empirically grounded and theoretically far-reaching understanding of one of the most fundamental and transformative institutions in America.
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GOVT 3223 : Was US Intervention in Libya To Remove Gaddafi a Mistake?
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3220, NES 3223 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Questions have arisen recently about the wisdom of the 2011 Western intervention in Libya, which resulted in the removal and assassination of Colonel Gaddafi, that country's long-time ruler. The question is being asked today in relation to the political chaos that ensued and the rise in today's Libya of political movements and forces favorable or connected to Al-Qaeda and ISIS. This course is not intended to settle that question as is currently formulated. Instead, the course approaches the question of intervention in Libya in terms of the connections between global governance, the responsibility to protect, and political order and democracy in the zones of intervention. In this context, the course has two aims. The first is to contrast the approach of the African Union to the resolution of the Libyan crisis, which was summarily dismissed by the US and its allies, with the preferred approach of the Permanent Western members of the UN Security Council.  The second aim is to examine the manner in which the responsibility to protect was executed in Libya and the lessons that might be gained from it. 
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GOVT 3333 : Is China Recolonizing Africa?
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3330 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
One key question about China's rise as an economic power has been what it does or is doing around the world. In this regard, China observers have taken note of emergence as the largest investors of late on the African continent. Also of significance is the fact that Chinese investments in Africa has been primarily in natural resources. This course is not about the benefits the concentration of investments in natural resources. Rather, it is about the manners in which China has defined its interests in Africa, pursued those interests, and the consequences that China's behavior for global governance, the domestic politics of African states, and the future well-being of African populations. Put into questions, the aims of this course are as follow: Should anyone should anyone worry about China's presence in Africa? Is China's presence part of the recolonizing of the Continent? Alternatively, is China's foray part of a global struggle for positioning between an emergent China and Africa's so-called traditional allies in the West? 
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GOVT 3401 : Refugees and the Politics of Vulnerability: Intersections of Feminist Theory and Practice
Crosslisted as: AMST 3420, FGSS 3400 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
"We're undone by each other. And if we're not, we're missing something," writes Judith Butler in Precarious Life. Can our mutual vulnerability serve as the basis for political intervention and social justice? More specifically, how does a politics of vulnerability help us address the worldwide refugee crisis? How does it limit or preclude an understanding of certain conditions? How might the notion of precarity / precarious lives supplement vulnerability? We will use the growing body of feminist scholarship on vulnerability in law, philosophy, migration studies, and other fields to analyze the refugee crisis in particular locations, including Central American refugees being detained in the U.S. and Syrian refugees fleeing to Europe. We will focus on the intersections of media representation, immigration policy, and activism.
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GOVT 3403 : China Under Revolution and Reform
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3321, CAPS 3403 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course provides a broad overview of the evolution of Chinese politics from the early part of the 20th century to the present. It is roughly divided into two sections. The first traces the formation and the progression of modern state and party institutions following the collapse of the Qing Dynasty in 1911, through the communist rise to power and into the Mao era (1949-1976), culminating in the period of "opening up and reform" (1978-present). The second part of the course examines China's institutional apparatus, focusing on mapping out the government, Party, and military bureaucracies; examining relations between Beijing and the localities; and on the institutionalization of these structures and processes over time. No prior knowledge of China is required or expected.
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GOVT 3494 : Special Topics in Regional Development and Globalization
Crosslisted as: AMST 3854, CRP 3854 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course addresses pertinent issues relative to the subject of regional development and globalization. Topics vary each semester.
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GOVT 3503 : Becoming a China Hand
Crosslisted as: CAPS 3502 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines the various issues that surround being a specialist of one of the world's most complex and exciting places. The course will first look at the various groups of people that have been China Hands, including missionaries, academics, businesspeople, journalists, and government officials. One central theme is the continual conflict between being a country specialist and gaining an understanding of the broader world. The second part of the class considers the strategies for going into the field and doing research on China, including finding a host and making connections, using written sources (electronic and printed), conducting interviews, and implementing formal surveys. The last segment of the class considers the charge that China Hands are prone to self-censorship because of ideological affinity.
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GOVT 3553 : Issues Behind the News
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will cover international current events as they unfold during the semester. Faculty from across the university will be invited to contextualize and deepen students' understanding of elections, wars, complex humanitarian emergencies, international agreements, global health issues, and other relevant international events that are in the news. The course will respond flexibly to unforeseen events. Special attention will be devoted to U.S. foreign policy issues and how U.S. foreign policies are formulated and implemented. The course will strive to expose students to different points of view on these issues.
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GOVT 3675 : Democracy and its Discontents
Crosslisted as: AMST 3678, CLASS 3675 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
A historical introduction to democratic theory through the writings of its greatest thinkers and their critics. Beginning with a study of the theory and practice of democratic rule in ancient Athens, we will explore continuities and innovations in democratic thinking in the revolutionary context of the Enlightenment, nineteenth-century social theory, and postcolonial responses to the consequences of the global hegemony of representational democracy in the twentieth century. Topics and themes we will consider include the value of democracy, the nature of equality, the duties and virtues of citizenship, the role of rhetoric and persuasion in democratic politics, the relationship between sovereignty and representation, and the politics of revolution. Lectures will be organized around both historical context and close reading of texts.
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GOVT 3736 : Ancient Political Thought
Crosslisted as: CLASS 3676 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course explores Ancient Greek and Roman political theory. We study key texts of thinkers such as Sophocles, Aristophanes Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero, to learn about differing constitutional forms and the source and authority of law, and also about justice, equality, and power, politics and morality, and politics and religion. Through the writings of dramatists, historians, philosophers, and politicians, we explore fundamental questions of political thought in their historical context (5th century BCE - 5th century CE) and also with a view to their ongoing relevance for contemporary political life.  
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GOVT 3745 : Nineteenth and Twentieth Century European Thought
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2240 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Survey of European social theory from Hegel to Foucault (via Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, and the Frankfurt School).
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GOVT 3809 : Politics of '70s Films
Crosslisted as: AMST 3809 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The 10 years from 1967 to 1976 were an extraordinary time both in the history of American politics and in the history of American film. In the same period that the country was rocked by the Vietnam War, the feminist and civil rights movements, Watergate and economic crisis, the end of Hollywood censorship along with demographic and economic change in the industry ushered in what many call "the last golden age" of American film. In this class we study both film theory and political history to examine these remarkable films and the political context in which they were forged. The goal of the course is to take seriously both the films and their politics.
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GOVT 3897 : Human Rights at War
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The 20th century witnessed some of the world's most destructive wars and human-rights atrocities - most of them connected to war and conflict. This course examines the impact of war on human rights and the impact of human-rights law and activism on war. It addresses such topics as genocide and "ethnic cleansing," the role of international law, just-war theory, transnational peace activism, humanitarian interventions, environmental and resource-related sources of conflict, nonviolent movements for social change, terrorism and counterterrorism. The readings feature approaches from a range of disciplines, including political science, history, ethics, law, anthropology, political ecology, and gender studies. Course work consists mainly of reading, lectures, discussion (in lectures and in sections), and regular writing assignments.
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GOVT 3990 : Puzzle Solving with Data
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
We introduce basic statistical reasoning with an emphasis on problems encountered in social science research. We explore the use of statistical tools to answer scientific research questions, and investigate the pitfalls associated with the misuse of statistics. By the end of the course students will be equipped to take more advanced statistics courses, and better prepared to evaluate quantitative claims made by social scientists and the media. Topics include: measurement and summary of data, exploratory data analysis, commonly-used probability distributions, statistical inference, basic linear regression and data visualization.
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GOVT 3999 : How Do You Know That?
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Does allowing citizens to carry concealed weapons reduce violent crime? Do affirmative action policies at law schools cause black students to fail the bar? Do micro-finance policies make the poor better off? Do the militaries of democracies fight better in the field than those of non-democracies? Does the death penalty save lives by deterring murders? Answering questions like these about the effects of public policy implies cause and effect knowledge: if we implement policy X, we will get effect Y. But on what evidence should answers to questions like these rest? How do you know the answer, and under what conditions can you? Providing robust answers to cause-and-effect questions in a (mostly) non-experimental field like political science is devilishly difficult. In this course, we will learn some of the pitfalls that make it so hard to evaluate evidence in the public policy realm, how to judge the quality of evidence cited in the media, and how to ask the right questions to get the best possible evidence. We'll do so by working through the evidence supporting "yes" or "no" answers to the questions listed above.
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GOVT 4000 : Major Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Major seminars in the Government department are small, advanced courses that cover an important theme or topic in contemporary politics in depth. Courses place particular emphasis on careful reading and classroom discussion, and students can expect to write a significant research paper. The enrollment limit is 15 students. These courses are open to all Cornell students, but preference in admissions is given to seniors over juniors, and to Government majors over other students.  Topics vary by semester and section.
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GOVT 4032 : Immigration and Politics Research Seminar
Crosslisted as: AMST 4032, LSP 4032 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Latinos are a greater presence in American society and political life than ever before.   Students in this course will explore themes such as immigration, political incorporation, inter-ethnic relations through both wide-ranging readings and the use of a unique dataset-- the 2006 Latino National Survey, a survey of 8,600 Latinos across 15 states, which includes questions ranging from crime and education to transnationalism and discrimination.  Students will be expected to learn and use statistical software to conduct preliminary analyses of these data, and to use these data and other resources to explore original research projects.  Prior coursework in American politics is recommended; no prior exposure to statistical software required.
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GOVT 4735 : Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
Crosslisted as: COML 4250, GERST 4250 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This is an introduction to the three 'master thinkers' who have helped determine the discourses of modernity and post-modernity. We consider basic aspects of their work: (a) specific critical and historical analyses; (b) theoretical and methodological writings; (c) programs and manifestos; and (d) styles of argumentation, documentation, and persuasion. This also entails an introduction, for non-specialists, to essential problems of political economy, continental philosophy, psychology, and literary and cultural criticism. Second, we compare the underlying assumptions and the interpretive yields of the various disciplines and practices founded by Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud: historical materialism and communism, existentialism and power-knowledge analysis, and psychoanalysis, respectively. We also consider how these three writers have been fused into a single constellation, 'Marx-Nietzsche-Freud,' and how they have been interpreted by others, including L. Althusser, A. Badiou, A. Camus, H. Cixous, G. Deleuze, J. Derrida, M. Foucault, H.-G. Gadamer, M. Heidegger, L. Irigaray, K. Karatani, J. Lacan, P. Ricoeur, L. Strauss, S. Zizek.
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GOVT 4827 : China, Tibet and Xinjiang
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4448, CAPS 4827, GOVT 6827 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Seminar intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system, with particular focus on the rise of Chinese nationalism and the extent to which those in Tibet, Xinjiang, and, to a lesser extent, Taiwan, are contesting such a trend. In so doing, the course emphasizes the interrelated, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy.
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GOVT 4959 : Honors Thesis: Research and Writing
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
GOVT 4959 is the second semester of honors thesis research, limited to students who have completed GOVT 4949, Honors Thesis Program. There is no formal class meeting. Instead, students will work on their own, with their advisers and other faculty they may consult. Following the plan developed in the fall semester, they will proceed to gather and analyze data or texts, turning in thesis chapters to the adviser on a regular schedule that the student and adviser develop.
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GOVT 4967 : The Collapse of the Soviet Union
Crosslisted as: HIST 4967 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the main factors that caused the collapse of the Soviet superpower at the end of the Cold War by situating the events of 1985-1991 in the wider context of Soviet history and post-1991 developments. Situated at the intersection of history and political science, this class aims to provide both the theoretical tools and the factual knowledge necessary to lead an independent and critical reflection on the Soviet disintegration process. At the end of the semester students should be able to assess the multiclausal explanations of the Soviet collapse and critically question the narratives that both media and policy makers use to make sense of these events today. The class will also encourage reflections on the similarities and differences between the methodological approaches employed by historians and political scientists.
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GOVT 4999 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
One-on-one tutorial arranged by the student with a faculty member of his or her choosing. Open to government majors doing superior work, and it is the responsibility of the student to establish the research proposal and to find a faculty sponsor. Applicants for independent study must present a well-defined program of study that cannot be satisfied by pursuing courses in the regularly scheduled curriculum. No more than 4 credits of independent study may count toward fulfillment of the major. Students who elect to continue taking this course for more than one semester must select a new theme or subject each semester. Credit can be given only for work that results in a satisfactory amount of writing. Emphasis is on the capacity to subject a body of related readings to analysis and criticism. Keep in mind that independent study cannot be used to fulfill the seminar requirement. The application form for independent study is available in 210 White Hall and must be completed at the beginning of the semester in which the course is being taken.
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GOVT 6029 : Advanced Regression Analysis
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course builds upon 6019, covering in detail the interpretation and estimation of multivariate linear regression models. We derive the Ordinary Least Squares estimator and its characteristics using matrix algebra and determine the conditions under which it achieves statistical optimality. We then consider the circumstances in social scientific contexts which commonly lead to assumption violations, and the detection and implications of these problems. This leads to modified regression estimators that can offer limited forms of robustness in some of these cases. Finally, we briefly introduce likelihood-based techniques that incorporate assumptions about the distribution of the response variable, focusing on logistic regression for binary dependent variables. Students are expected to produce a research paper built around a quantitative analysis that is suitable for presentation at a professional conference. Some time will be spent reviewing matrix algebra, and discussing ways to implement computations using statistical software.
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GOVT 6045 : Law and Literature
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3762, ENGL 6710, LAW 6710 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
What can lawyers and judges learn from the study of literature? This course explores the relevance of imaginative literature (novels, drama, poetry, and film) to questions of law and social justice from a range of perspectives. We will consider debates about how literature can help to humanize legal decision-making; how storytelling has helped to give voice to oppressed populations over history; how narratives of suffering cultivate popular support for human rights; the role played by storytelling in a trial; and how literature can shed light on the limits of law and public policy.
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GOVT 6053 : Comparative Method in International and Comparative Politics
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
An in-depth, graduate-level introduction to qualitative and comparative methods of political analysis, with special emphasis on the application of these methods in comparative and international politics. Through readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will explore strategies for concept formation, theory construction, and theory testing, using the craft and tools of comparative political analysis.
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GOVT 6069 : Causal Inference
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In this seminar we study the assumptions and estimators that can estimate causal effects in the social sciences, with particular emphasis on addressing effect heterogeneity and robustness to assumption failures. Applications include all of those studied in previous quantitative social science courses, but we will consider examples in the study of turnout, campaign effects, educational differences, and welfare policy.
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GOVT 6075 : Field Seminar in Political Thought
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The seminar will explore readings in the history of political thought from Homer to the Twenty-first century.
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GOVT 6079 : Advanced Topics Mini-Course
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In this 7-week seminar we elaborate social statistics topics only briefly covered in earlier courses, depending on student research interests. Example broad approaches could include Bayesian or nonparametric methods, and more specific applications could include textual analysis, survival analysis, structural equation modeling, and growth curve models. Students are encouraged to attend the first organizational meeting of the course to discuss possible foci.
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GOVT 6171 : Politics of Public Policy
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The prevailing approach to policy analysis gives little attention to politics, yet public policies are defined through political processes, designed and implemented in the context of political institutions, and in turn shape politics and public life. This course examines how political scientists think about public policy, showcasing a variety of approaches that take politics seriously.  The course focuses on American political institutions and the particular challenges and opportunities they present to the creation and development of public policies. It investigates policymaking processes and institutions, agenda setting, policy design, implementation, sustainability, and feedback.
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GOVT 6215 : Michel Foucault: Sovereignty to BioPolitics
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6212, ENGL 6912 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will explore the ways in which Michel Foucault's oeuvre transitions from a concern with sovereignty to a preoccupation with biopolitics. Foucault's early work (one understands that there is no absolute Foucaultian division into "sovereignty" and "biopolitics"), such as "Madness and Civilization," attends to the structure, the construction and the force of the institution -- the birth of asylum, the prison, while his later career takes up the question of, for want of a better term, "political efficiency." That is, Foucault offers a critique of sovereignty insofar as sovereignty is inefficient (neither the sovereign nor sovereign power can be everywhere; certainly not everywhere it needs or wants to be; ubiquity is impossible, even/especially for a project such as sovereignty) while biopower is not. Biopower marks this recognition; in place of sovereignty biopower "devolves" to the individual subject the right, always an intensely political phenomenon, to make decisions about everyday decisions -- decisions about health, sexuality, "lifestyle." In tracing the foucaultian trajectory from sovereignty to biopower we will read the major foucaultian texts -- "Madness and Civilization," "Birth of the Prison," "History of Sexuality" as well as the various seminars where Foucault works out important issues.
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GOVT 6304 : Historical Analysis in Comparative Politics
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This is a graduate seminar in political science on the application of historical analysis in comparative politics. The goals of the course are for students to understand the contemporary application of historical analysis in comparative politics and to familiarize themselves with current scholarly standards of such research, and then to produce research that meets those standards. Students will read and analyze peer-reviewed research (or near published research) on this topic each week and write a final research paper.
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GOVT 6586 : Schmitt, Strauss, Arendt
Crosslisted as: GERST 6586 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This is an advanced graduate seminar exploring the work of three important twentieth century political theorists: Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss, and Hannah Arendt.  We will engage their work chronologically and contextually, examining how each responded, first, to the central political problems of their time, including the crisis of liberalism and parliamentary democracy, the rise of totalitarianism, statelessness, and moral and legal relativism; second, their responses to such central theoretical problems as the meaning of the political, political theology, and the distinctiveness of political theory as a form of political inquiry; and, third, their critical encounters, implicit and explicit, with each other's work.     
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GOVT 6827 : China, Tibet and Xinjiang
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4448, CAPS 4827, GOVT 4827 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This seminar is intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system, with particular focus on the rise of Chinese nationalism and the extent to which those in Tibet, Xinjiang, and, to a lesser extent, Taiwan, are contesting such a trend. In so doing, the course emphasizes the interrelated, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy.  
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GOVT 6897 : International Security
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will examine a variety of international relations theories in studying a broad range of security issues, including the causes of war, alliance formation, balance-of-power politics, security regimes, nuclear and conventional deterrence, the democratic peace, military strategy, international terrorism, and domestic constraints on the use of force. We will use a variety of theoretical perspectives to investigate these and other issues, paying particular attention to evaluating the theoretical arguments with both historical and systematic evidence. 
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GOVT 7999 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Individualized readings and research for graduate students. Topics, readings, and writing requirements are designed through consultation between the student and the instructor. Graduate students in government who are looking to use this as an option to fulfill their course requirements should check with their chairs to be certain that the program of study is acceptable for this purpose. Applications must be completed and signed by the instructor and by the chairs of their special committees. They are available from, and must be returned to, the graduate assistant in 212 White Hall.
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