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Peter Katzenstein Book Prize

Peter Katzenstein

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The Katzenstein Prize, in honor of in honor of Peter J. Katzenstein, the Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies at Cornell University, recognizes an outstanding first book in International Relations, Comparative Politics, or Political Economy.   The prize was established on the occasion of Professor Katzenstein’s 40th Year at Cornell University and has been made possible by the generous support of his colleagues, collaborators, and former students.

The selection committee for the prize changes from year to year, but general questions may be addressed to Jonathan Kirshner jdk5@cornell.edu or Matthew Evangelista mae10@cornell.edu. Nominations and copies of the books themselves should go to the selection committee, when it is announced on this website or elsewhere.  In fact, sending the book constitutes the nomination.  There is no formal letter required.

We are pleased to call for submissions for the 2017 Peter Katzenstein book prize.  Books eligible for this year's prize should have a publication date of 2016.  To be considered for the 2017 prize, please send two copies of eligible books – one to each of the following addresses – before March 3, 2017:

  • Katzenstein Book Prize Committee, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, 100 Eggers Hall, Syracuse, New York 13244
  • Katzenstein Book Prize Committee, 305R Raitt Hall, Political Science Division, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195

2016

Awarded to David Steinberg, for his Demanding Devaluation: Exchange Rate Politics in the Developing World (Cornell, 2015).

Demanding Devaluation makes a substantial contribution to the fields of comparative and international political economy.  This well-written, carefully-argued, innovative book addresses a fascinating puzzle: while the consensus among economists -- and the historical experience of countries like China and South Korea -- suggest that exchange rate undervaluation should be the norm among developing countries, a great many such countries in fact maintain overvalued exchange rates. David Steinberg presents an elegant solution to this puzzle by developing a two-part theory that focuses on the power and the preferences of domestic actors.  At the heart of the approach is what Steinberg calls the “conditional preference theory.”  Whereas much theory in political economy assumes that manufacturing firms always prefer undervaluation, Steinberg makes the case that their preferences in fact depend on the nature of national labor and financial market institutions. It is only when state control in those areas solves some of the problems that undervaluation can create for firms that the manufacturing sector should be expected to support under- rather than overvaluation.  Demanding Devaluation’s compelling theoretical framework emphasizes the context-specificity of exchange rate preferences while maintaining that those preferences remain predictable.  The book adds complexity to explanations of the formation of firm preferences, and its extensive quantitative evidence, well-chosen qualitative case studies, and research in multiple languages provide ample support for the argument.  Demanding Devaluation will undoubtedly become an essential read for students, scholars and practitioners interested in the politics of exchange rates—and, more broadly, in the political economy of developing states.


2015

Awarded to Paul Staniland for his Networks of Rebellion: Explaining Insurgent Cohesion and Collapse (Cornell, 2014).

In Networks of Rebellion, Paul Staniland has produced a theoretically elegant and empirically rich study of the local politics of insurgency.  Staniland convincingly argues that to understand insurgency we must first understand the insurgents and their political networks—how they are organized, why they sometimes flourish, and why at other moments they founder. The influence of Networks of Rebellion is likely to be immense.  Staniland’s scholarship contributes to understanding the national and international politics of insurgency, civil war, and conflict resolution, seamlessly crossing into the fields of comparative politics, international relations, and security studies. The findings of this excellent book should also shape how policymakers think about and respond to insurgencies. In addition to Staniland’s impressive field and historical research, Networks of Rebellion demonstrates how the scholarly literature on networks and social ties has much to contribute to our understanding of contemporary patterns of violence in South and Southeast Asia as well as around the world.  Informed by Staniland’s interpretation of the organizational dynamics of insurgent groups, Networks of Rebellion is an outstanding book that is most deserving of the Katzenstein prize.


2014

Awarded to Katerina Linos for her book, The Democratic Foundations of Policy Diffusion: How Health, Family and Employment Spread Across Countries (Oxford 2013).

This impressive book draws on a sophisticated research design, wide-ranging theorizing, and rigorous and creative empirical methods to offer the novel and powerful argument that international models matter in policy choice.  Linos brings together her interests in both political science and international law to study the mechanisms by which democracies adopt health care, family and labor law models from abroad.  Her motivating puzzle is the question of why rich democracies, which have strong domestic policy-building capacities, would need to borrow models from abroad.  She argues that even they find “international benchmarking” useful.  The theoretical framework draws widely from literature on diffusion and on domestic and comparative social policymaking, and the analysis focuses on the role played by the authoritativeness of models promoted by international organizations and by prominent rich states. The study employs cross-country regression models and qualitative analysis to estimate the impact of domestic and international factors on policy choice.  It draws on three types of empirical evidence:  experimental public opinion data, cross-national regressions over eighteen democracies over several decades, and qualitative case studies comparing early and late adopters.  Challenging technocratic arguments about policy diffusion, Linos argues that ordinary voters’ uncertainties and politicians’ reelection concerns are critical to policy diffusion;  international models can help politicians rally voter support behind proposed reforms.  The extensive and innovative research highlights the interactions between the domestic and international realms and applies rigorous social science methods to tell us something new and important about international law.


2013

Awarded to Harris Mylonas of George Washington University, for his book, The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees, and Minorities (Cambridge University Press, 2012)

In a strong field of excellent first books, The Politics of Nation-Building by Harris Mylonas distinguishes itself on several dimensions.  It addresses an important question at the intersection of international and comparative politics by productively combining insights from theories of Comparative Politics and International Relations and by reformulating key concepts in the study of nation-building.   Mylonas argues that certain elements of the international system predispose nation-building élites towards particular strategies: accommodation, assimilation, or exclusion.  These elements include their country’s relationship with other states – whether allies or enemies – and whether foreign states support the non-core groups in the nation-building state.   Mylonas also incorporates in his geostrategic analysis whether the nation-building state itself pursues status-quo or revisionist goals, particularly in regard to its territorial ambitions.  Mylonas fashions creative hypotheses linking these elements and tests them on a body of rich empirical material; his analysis is sophisticated, subtle, and insightful.