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GOVT 6109 : Field Methods
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
GOVT 6089 : Time Series Analysis
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course considers statistical techniques to analyze time series data. We will pay particular attention to common time series methods, assumptions, and examples from political and social science. The course will offer a general introduction to the topic and will cover more advanced topics, such as cointegration, error correction models, vector autoregression, fractional integration, and time-series cross-sectional analysis.
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GOVT 6075 : Field Seminar in Political Thought
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The seminar will explore readings in the history of political thought from Homer to the Twenty-first century.
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GOVT 6067 : Field Seminar in International Relations
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
General survey of the literature and propositions of the international relations field. Criteria are developed for judging theoretical propositions and are applied to the major findings. Participants are expected to do extensive reading in the literature as well as research.
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GOVT 6022 : Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S.
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6022 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course examines racial and ethnic politics in the United States, highlighting its fundamental and constitutive role in shaping American politics more broadly. We will explore the political origins of the American racial order and the ways it has both persisted and changed over time. Focusing on participation, representation and resistance, we will emphasize the political agency of racialized groups while recognizing the power of institutions and policies in shaping their trajectory. This course should provide students with the knowledge and analytical tools necessary to better understand and more effectively study the complexities of race that loom large in a post-Ferguson, post-Obama America.  
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GOVT 6019 : Introduction to Probability and Applied Statistics
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4019 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The goal of this course is to introduce probability and statistics as fundamental building blocks for quantitative political analysis, with regression modeling as a focal application. We will begin with a brief survey of probability theory, types of measurements, and descriptive statistics. The bulk of the course then addresses inferential statistics, covering in detail sampling, methods for estimating unknown quantities, and methods for evaluating competing hypotheses. We will see how to formally assess estimators, and some basic principles that help to ensure optimality. Along the way, we will introduce the use of regression models to specify social scientific hypotheses, and employ our expanding repertoire of statistical concepts to understand and interpret estimates based on our data. Weekly lab exercises require students to deploy the methods both 'by hand' so they can grasp the basic mathematics, and by computer to meet the conceptual demands of non-trivial examples and prepare for independent research. Some time will be spent reviewing algebra, calculus, and elementary logic, as well as introducing computer statistical packages.
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GOVT 4999 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
One-on-one tutorial arranged by the student with a faculty member of his or her choosing. Open to government majors doing superior work, and it is the responsibility of the student to establish the research proposal and to find a faculty sponsor. Applicants for independent study must present a well-defined program of study that cannot be satisfied by pursuing courses in the regularly scheduled curriculum. No more than 4 credits of independent study may count toward fulfillment of the major. Students who elect to continue taking this course for more than one semester must select a new theme or subject each semester. Credit can be given only for work that results in a satisfactory amount of writing. Emphasis is on the capacity to subject a body of related readings to analysis and criticism. Keep in mind that independent study cannot be used to fulfill the seminar requirement. The application form for independent study must be completed at the beginning of the semester in which the course is being taken.
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GOVT 4986 : Other Feminisms
Crosslisted as: GOVT 6986 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Other Feminisms is a survey of contemporary critical approaches to feminist theory today. it seeks to complicate the traditional depiction of feminist theory as "white," "transphobic," "Eurocentic"/western.  Canonical works of feminist theory such as Shulamith Firestone or Simone de Beauvoir are re-situated in relation to contemporaneous writing such as the Combahee River Collective's Black Feminist Statement as well as projected into the speculative fiction of Octavia Butler and Ursula Le Guin. "Other feminisms" will comprise experiments in genre as well as gender in Kathy Acker, Donna Haraway, Hélène Cixous, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossein ("Sultana's Dream"). We will explore the contributions of theories of intersectionality, object-oriented ontologies, disability studies, affect theory, transnational explorations of Islamic piety movements and Iranian trans and same sex communities to what Clare Hemmings calls "the political grammar of feminist theory."
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GOVT 4949 : Honors Seminar: Thesis Clarification and Research
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar creates a structured environment in which honors students will examine different  research approaches and methods and construct a research design for their own theses—a thesis proposal that probes a new or inadequately researched question of importance to the discipline of political science or political theory. Apart from being a thesis writing workshop, the honors research class serves as a capstone course giving an overview of the different topics and methods addressed by students of politics. Members of the class will do extensive reading in published work relevant to their topics, and write a critical summary of that literature. Each member of the class will present their research design and central question(s) to the class for constructive criticism. By the end of the class, each honors student will have written the first chapter of the thesis, including the statement of the question, literature review, key definitions, methodology, and identification of data source(s). They will be working closely with an individual faculty adviser, as well as interacting with the research class. Students are strongly encouraged to examine some past honors theses on reserve at Kroch library in order to get an idea of the standards a government thesis must meet.
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GOVT 4807 : Social Studies of Space, Technologies and Borders
Crosslisted as: DSOC 4301, STS 4301 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Christine Leuenberger
In this course we will discuss how society, culture and politics shape technological artifacts and the natural and built environment, such as bridges, roads, and landscapes in diverse cultural contexts. We will examine reasons for the rise in bordering mechanisms - ranging from walls, barriers to fences within cities as well as along national borders, in such countries such as Ireland, Korea, Germany, the US, and Israel. We will compare how such 'strategies of exclusion' impact local communities, transnational relations and social connectivity across such divides. We will also examine how the growth of gated communities has reconfigured urban spaces and given rise to new forms of spatial and social segregation.
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