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GOVT 7937 : Proseminar in Peace Studies
Crosslisted as: HIST 7937, STS 7937 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Proseminar in Peace Studies offers a multidisciplinary review of issues related to peace and conflict at the graduate level. The course is led by the director of the Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and is based on the Institute's weekly seminar series, featuring outside visitors and Cornell faculty. 
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GOVT 6897 : International Security
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will examine a variety of international relations theories in studying a broad range of security issues, including the causes of war, alliance formation, balance-of-power politics, security regimes, nuclear and conventional deterrence, the democratic peace, military strategy, international terrorism, and domestic constraints on the use of force. We will use a variety of theoretical perspectives to investigate these and other issues, paying particular attention to evaluating the theoretical arguments with both historical and systematic evidence. 
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GOVT 6857 : International Political Economy
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Exploration into a range of contemporary theories and research topics in the field of international political economy. The seminar covers different theoretical perspectives and a number of substantive problems.
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GOVT 6775 : Language and Politics
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the nature and power of speech in ancient political theory alongside contemporary debates over the political and epistemological consequences of different philosophies of language.  Writers examined will include Aeschylus, Euripides, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle.
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GOVT 6303 : Comparative Political Economy and Global Debates
Crosslisted as: ILRIC 6330 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Lowell Turner
From a perspective rooted in comparative political economy, this graduate seminar examines the politics of economic inequality in the United States and Europe.  The emphasis is contemporary: growing inequality, causes and consequences.  Active participation in discussion is expected, and each student will write a substantial term paper.
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GOVT 6294 : Parties, Populism and Movements
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Political parties, populism, and social movements are all forms of political representation, but typically they are studied in isolation from one another.  This research seminar will explore the interrelationships between them—namely, how populism and social movements tend to emerge where partisan representation is weak or ineffectual, and how populism and social movements can break down or reconfigure party systems.  Readings will include classic theoretical and empirical analyses of parties, populism, and movements, as well as recent works that explore the intersections among them. Students will help lead seminar discussions and write a research paper in one of the three areas of interest.
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GOVT 6242 : Experiment and Survey Design
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed to provide doctoral students in political science with an introduction to experiment and survey design. Students will discuss all major types of experiments (e.g. field, lab, survey, natural, and economics), methods for analyzing experimental data, and methods for designing questionnaires that appear in experiments. The goal will be to convey a rich appreciation for the possibilities that experimental research offers, as well as a thoughtful understanding of the shortcomings of this research method. In addition, students will gain valuable knowledge in questionnaire design that can be used not only in experiments but in all forms of research that involve surveys (such as focus groups, one-on-one interviews, etc.).  
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GOVT 6215 : Michel Foucault: Sovereignty to BioPolitics
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6212, ENGL 6912 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Grant Farred
This course will explore the ways in which Michel Foucault's oeuvre transitions from a concern with sovereignty to a preoccupation with biopolitics. Foucault's early work (one understands that there is no absolute Foucaultian division into "sovereignty" and "biopolitics"), such as "Madness and Civilization," attends to the structure, the construction and the force of the institution -- the birth of asylum, the prison, while his later career takes up the question of, for want of a better term, "political efficiency." That is, Foucault offers a critique of sovereignty insofar as sovereignty is inefficient (neither the sovereign nor sovereign power can be everywhere; certainly not everywhere it needs or wants to be; ubiquity is impossible, even/especially for a project such as sovereignty) while biopower is not. Biopower marks this recognition; in place of sovereignty biopower "devolves" to the individual subject the right, always an intensely political phenomenon, to make decisions about everyday decisions -- decisions about health, sexuality, "lifestyle." In tracing the foucaultian trajectory from sovereignty to biopower we will read the major foucaultian texts -- "Madness and Civilization," "Birth of the Prison," "History of Sexuality" as well as the various seminars where Foucault works out important issues.
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GOVT 6202 : Political Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 6202, ANTHR 6102, HIST 6202, SOC 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore the relationship between popular belief, political action, and the institutional deployment of social power. The class will be roughly divided in three parts, opening with a discussion of how the material world influences the culture of a society. The middle section will connect culture to political ideology, including symbolism and the construction of group identity. The last part of the course will consider ways in which cultural symbols and ideology can be manipulated in order to legitimate government authority. We will then, coming full circle, trace how political regimes can influence the social practices from which culture originates.
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GOVT 6053 : Comparative Method in International and Comparative Politics
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An in-depth, graduate-level introduction to qualitative and comparative methods of political analysis, with special emphasis on the application of these methods in comparative and international politics. Through readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will explore strategies for concept formation, theory construction, and theory testing, using the craft and tools of comparative political analysis.
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